The following college-level policies are subject to University Council Regulations. In the absence of information, or in the case of discrepancies between university and college regulations, university regulations will prevail. Please note that students will graduate according to the regulations effective for the year in which they are approved to graduate. In all other cases, the most current rules will apply, unless otherwise stated. 

Degrees, Diplomas, and Certificates

At the College of Agriculture and Bioresources, certificate, diploma, undergraduate and postgraduate degree training is available in a wide range of specializations. The student experience is enhanced when teaching and scholarship are offered in a research-rich environment.

The College of Agriculture and Bioresources offers the following options for four-year applied science undergraduate degree programs: the Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, the Bachelor of Science in Agribusiness, the Bachelor of Science in Animal Bioscience, or the Bachelor of Science in Renewable Resource Management.

The Bachelor of Science in Agriculture provides students with a sound basis in the natural and social sciences and a broad knowledge of agriculture, agri-food systems, and the role of agriculture in both a regional and global context. Graduates will be prepared to address major agricultural issues and challenges, including resource use consistent with sustainable production of food, feed, fibre, and fuel; production, processing and marketing of high quality food and non-food products; and research, development and implementation of innovative and efficient production, processing and marketing systems. There are numerous and wide-ranging fields of study to choose from in the B.S.A. degree.

After completing their first year of study, students typically declare their major field of study. Majors in the B.S.A. include Agricultural Biology, Agricultural Economics, Agronomy, Animal Science, Applied Plant Ecology, Crop Science, Environmental Science, Food and Bioproduct Sciences, Horticulture Science, and Soil Science. Double majors are not permitted; however, an 18 credit unit minor in an approved field of study can also be declared. Honours concentrations are available for the Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Biology majors, and provide an enriched selection of courses to better prepare students for graduate studies. 

The Bachelor of Science in Agribusiness degree program is made up of a combination of agricultural economics and business courses. Graduates will understand the structure and organization of the agri-food sector and will possess business skills with particular application to the value chain extending from farm inputs through on-farm businesses, to processing, transportation, credit and marketing. An Honours concentration is available for the B.Sc. (Agbus) degree, which provides an enriched selection of courses to better prepare students for graduate studies.

The Bachelor of Science in Animal Bioscience [B.Sc.(An.Biosc.)] provides students with a broad background in domestic animal biology (animal metabolism, genetics, physiology, nutrition, behavior, care, social and environmental impact) and prepares them to work in fields outside of traditional animal agriculture, including biomedical sciences, companion, equine and research animal care, animal health and environmental sciences.  This program meets the pre-veterinary medicine requirements.

The Bachelor of Science in Renewable Resource Management is an applied science degree that prepares students for careers in renewable resource management. The B.Sc.(RRM) degree focuses on management of land, biotic, and water resources and provides sufficient technical skills to ensure that graduates are highly employable in the resource sector. Additionally, this program provides opportunities to explore areas of interest in the social and natural sciences, which are the hallmark of a university education. The B.Sc.(RRM) offers two majors: Resource Science, and Resource Economics and Policy.

Students enrolled in any of these degree programs are required to achieve a cumulative weighted average of 60% on 120 credit units of approved courses in order to graduate.

A minor in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources consists of 18 credit units of courses in a field of study outside a student’s major and within a degree. These courses typically take the place of the restricted electives or open electives in a degree program. At least 12 credit units in the minor must consist of courses that are not specifically required for a student’s major. 

The following minors are available to students in the B.S.A. degree program: Agribusiness, Agribusiness Entrepreneurship, Animal Science, Applied Microbiology, Applied Plant Ecology, Biotechnology, Field Crop Production, Food and Bioproduct Sciences, Horticulture Science, Nutrition, Rangeland Resources, Soil Science, and Toxicology

The following minors are available to students in the B.Sc. (Agbus) degree program: Agribusiness Entrepreneurship or Field Crop Production.

The following minors are available to students in the B.Sc. (RRM): Animal Science, Applied Plant Ecology (with Resource Science major only), Rangeland Resources, Soil Science (with Resource Science major only), and Toxicology.

There are no minors for the B.Sc. (An.Biosc.) degree program.

Consisting of degree-level courses, the Diploma in Agribusiness and the Diploma in Agronomy ladder directly into specific degree programs in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources.  Graduates of the Diploma in Agronomy or the Diploma in Agribusiness are eligible for professional designation as Technical Agrologists (TechAg) with the Saskatchewan Institute of Agrologists.

The Diploma in Agribusiness is a two year program made up of a combination of agricultural economics and business courses. This mix of courses provides graduates with an understanding of the structure and organization of the agri-food sector. Students completing the Diploma in Agribusiness have the option of completing an additional 60 credit units of approved coursework in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Agribusiness degree. 

The Diploma in Agronomy is a two year program made up of a combination of plant science and soil science courses. These courses provide graduates with practical skills in field agronomy and diagnostics and a broader knowledge of the agricultural sector. Students completing the Diploma in Agronomy have the option of completing an additional 60 credit units of approved coursework in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture (B.S.A.) degree with a major in Agronomy.

The Kanawayihetaytan Askiy Diploma in Aboriginal Lands Governance provides students with a broad background in governance, management, administration and political science as they relate to Aboriginal communities. This mix of classes prepares graduates for roles in governance in their communities and leadership in local, provincial and national settings.

The Kanawayihetaytan Askiy Diploma in Aboriginal Resource Management provides a broad background in resource management for Aboriginal communities. The program provides graduates with the skills required for future employment as land managers, as well as the scientific and background knowledge required for research and leadership in local, provincial, and national settings. 

Students enrolled in any of these diploma programs are required to achieve a cumulative weighted average of 60% on 60 credit units of approved courses in order to graduate.

The Kanawayihetaytan Askiy Certificate is a one-year modular program made up of courses on environmental, legal, and economic aspects of land and resource management in Aboriginal communities. These courses provide graduates with an understanding of Aboriginal rights, traditional knowledge, intellectual property law, and resource management. Completion of the Kanawayihetaytan Askiy Certificate satisfies the post-secondary level one requirements of the Professional Lands Management Certification Program (PLMCP) offered by the National Aboriginal Lands Management Association (NALMA).

Students who have completed the Kanawayiheytaytan Askiy or Indigenous Peoples Resource Management Certificates can ladder into either the Kanawayiheytaytan Askiy Diploma in Aboriginal Lands Governance or the Kanawayiheytaytan Askiy Diploma in Aboriginal Resource Management.

Students enrolled in the Kanawayihetaytan Askiy Certificate program are required to achieve a cumulative weighted average of 60% on 21 credit units of approved courses in order to graduate.

Students who wish to apply to the U of S Western College of Veterinary Medicine may complete the prerequisite courses for admission to this program through the College of Agriculture and Bioresources.

Second Degree and Diploma Regulations

Second Degrees and Diplomas within the College of Agriculture and Bioresources

Students who have completed a diploma program in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources can ladder into an approved degree program in the College.

The following regulations apply to students who have completed an undergraduate degree or diploma program from the College of Agriculture and Bioresources, and wish to complete a second undergraduate degree or diploma program from the College of Agriculture and Bioresources:

Permission may be granted to obtain a second undergraduate degree or diploma from the College of Agriculture and Bioresources in a different field of study, for which a minimum of 30 credit units unique to the new degree or diploma must be completed. Courses that have counted previously towards both a major and minor cannot be used to meet the requirements of the new qualification. Permission to obtain a second degree or diploma program from the College of Agriculture and Bioresources in a closely related field of study is at the discretion of the department responsible for the new qualification sought.

Second Degrees in Different Colleges

Students pursuing two undergraduate degrees must consult with the Dean's office in each college to determine program requirements and to select courses which could be credited towards each degree.

Study Abroad Opportunities

For information on study abroad opportunities at the University of Saskatchewan, please visit the Study Abroad website. Students wishing to study abroad must have a Letter of Permission on file at the College of Agriculture and Bioresources' Dean's Office prior to leaving for their exchange program in order to receive transfer credit towards their program. Changes to the approved classes while a student is abroad must also be approved in writing in order for transfer credit to be guaranteed.

Dean's Honour Roll

Once a year, the Dean of Agriculture and Bioresources honours those students who have achieved a sessional average of 80% or better in at least 24 credit units in a degree or diploma program taken during the previous academic year (September to April).  Students on the Dean’s Honour Roll will be notified and the Honour Roll will be posted within the College.

Academic Awards to Graduates

Students achieving high levels of academic performance will be awarded their degree or diploma as follows:

Cumulative Weighted Average:

70.00-74.99%
Major: No Academic Award
Honours: Honours (option)

75.00-79.99%
Major: Distinction
Honours: Honours (option) with Distinction

80.00% or better
Major: Great Distinction
Honours: Honours (option) with Great Distinction

Acceptable Humanities, Fine Arts, Natural and Social Sciences Course Areas

Number of Junior Credits Allowed:

The number of junior credits that can be credited in any given subject will be determined by the College with academic authority for the subject area. In most cases a maximum of six credits of junior or 100-level credit can be applied.

  • Chinese
  • Classics
  • Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Studies
  • Cree
  • English
  • French
  • German
  • Greek
  • Hebrew
  • History
  • Hindi
  • Japanese
  • Latin
  • Literature
  • Philosophy
  • Religious Studies
  • Russian
  • Sanskrit
  • Spanish
  • Ukrainian
  • Art
  • Art History
  • Drama
  • Music
  • Anthropology
  • Archaeology
  • Economics*
  • Geography**
  • Indigenous Studies
  • International Studies
  • Linguistics
  • Planning
  • Political Studies
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
  • Women's and Gender Studies

*Students majoring in Agricultural Economics or pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Agribusiness cannot take economics courses to meet this requirement.

**The following Geography courses are not acceptable to meet this requirement: GEOG 101, 102, 111, 112, 120, 125, 210, 222, 225, 233, 235.

  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Physics
  • Geography(Physical)
  • Geology

Saskatchewan Institute of Agrologists

The Agrologists Act (1994) requires that persons practicing agrology in the province of Saskatchewan be registered with the Saskatchewan Institute of Agrologists and pay an annual fee for a licence to practice agrology. Agrologists are regulated for competent and ethical practice to protect the public interest, in the same manner as professional engineers (PEng), chartered professional accountants (CPA), physicians (MD), lawyers, and other regulated professions.

Graduates of the College of Agriculture and Bioresources' degree and diploma programs who intend to practice agrology must apply to be registered as articling agrologists immediately upon graduation. After completing the articling program, full members who have completed a degree hold the designation of professional agrologist (PAg); full members who have completed the Diploma in Agronomy or Diploma in Agribusiness  hold the designation of Technical Agrologist (TechAg).

Note: The SIA offers Student Affiliate Memberships for an annual fee of $20 to all Agriculture and Bioresources' students. Student members are eligible for several SIA scholarships and receive weekly information newsletters about the profession. In addition, Student Affiliate Members are eligible to have the $200 application fee waived after graduation.

If you have any questions about the legislative requirements of practicing agrology please contact info@sia.sk.ca or 306-242-2606. For more information about the SIA, visit their website: www.sia.sk.ca.

College Regulations

It is expected that students will complete their degree programs within 10 years of their first registration. Students taking more than 10 years to complete their programs will normally be required to meet current degree and graduation requirements. For more information, please contact the college.

The following regulations apply to students who have been admitted to the College of Agriculture and Bioresources with a prerequisite deficiency.

B.S.A. (all programs), B.Sc. in Renewable Resource Management, and Diploma in Agronomy:
Students can be admitted to these programs with one prerequisite deficiency (Biology 30, Chemistry 30, or Foundations of Mathematics 30/Pre-Calculus 30) that must be cleared before the second year of study in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources. Students failing to clear deficiencies before their second year will not be allowed to register. This regulation is strictly enforced and it is the responsibility of the student to address any deficiencies.

If a student has not completed their high school prerequisites in Biology, Chemistry, or Math and they wish to take a University science course that requires these prerequisites, they must complete high school prerequisites or their equivalents first.

High school prerequisite courses can be completed through a variety of local institutions, such as Saskatoon Catholic Cyber School, Parkland College, Nutana Collegiate, Royal West Campus, Saskatchewan Polytechnic, and Sunwest Distance Learning Centre.

Alternatively:

  • A Math 30 deficiency can be cleared through successful completion of MATH 102.3, provided that the course prerequisite has been met, or approval has been granted by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics to register. (Note: Students are allowed to have credit for only one of MATH 102 or 104; students who take MATH 102 and then take MATH 104 will lose credit for MATH 102. MATH 102 may be used as an alternative prerequisite for MATH 110).

B.Sc. in Agribusiness and Diploma in Agribusiness:
Students can be admitted to the B.Sc. in Agribusiness and the Diploma in Agribusiness with one prerequisite deficiency in either Biology 30 or Chemistry 30 or Physics 30 and Foundations of Mathematics 30/Pre-Calculus 30 that must be cleared before the second year of study in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources, as described above.

If a student has not completed their high school prerequisites in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or Math and they wish to take a University science course that requires these prerequisites, they must complete high school prerequisites or their equivalents first.

A deficiency in Biology 30, Chemistry 30 or Physics 30 may be waived if the student achieves a cumulative average of 65% in the first 18 to 30 cu completed at the University of Saskatchewan. A student can apply for a deficiency waiver by contacting the Director, Student and Academic Affairs, College of Agriculture and Bioresources. Students who wish to take a course requiring a prerequisite cannot have the prerequisite deficiency waived. A Mathematics deficiency cannot be waived.

If a student with a deficiency waiver subsequently changes their major or program, the waiver is no longer in effect and the high school prerequisites or equivalents must be completed.

B.Sc. in Animal Bioscience:
Because admission to the B.Sc. in Animal Bioscience is competitive, students cannot be admitted with a prerequisite deficiency.

Year in Program Calculation:

Credit Units completed to September of current year

Year in Program

0 - 18 Credit Units

1st year

21 - 48 Credit Units

2nd year

51 - 78 Credit Units

3rd year

81-120 Credit Units

4th year

A student's weighted average for a year's work, the Sessional Weighted Average, is based on all courses attempted during the Fall and Winter Terms. Spring and Summer Term marks are not included. Attempted courses are defined as those continued beyond the last day for dropping courses. Fall Term marks in failed courses will be replaced by Winter Term marks for average calculation purposes, if the failed courses are repeated and passed in Winter Term. Classes that are dropped before the add/drop deadline will not appear on a student’s transcript; classes that are dropped after the add/drop deadline, but before the withdrawal deadline will appear on transcripts as a W (withdrawal). The W grade alternative has no academic standing and does not impact a student’s average. Failure of a class due to incomplete class work will result in a calculated percentage grade. In the event that this results in a passing grade, the student will be issued a 49% INF (Incomplete Failure).

Where Academic Dishonesty has been proven, the actual grades assigned by the College Discipline Committee will be used in the calculation of promotion averages.

These provisions apply to all students who at any time during the September to April period are registered in 18 or more credit units. Students not meeting the Promotion Averages in 4(a) will be either placed on Probation in 4(b) or Required to Discontinue in 4(c).

a. Promotion Standards

Credit Units to September of Current Year Sessional Average for Promotion
18 Credit Units 55.00%
>18 - 48 Credit Units 57.50%
>48 - 120 Credit Units 60.00%*

Students who meet the Promotion standards for the College of Agriculture and Bioresources are allowed to continue in their program without any academic restrictions beyond ensuring that they meet the academic prerequisites for any courses in their program(s).

*Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 60% to be eligible to graduate from any certificate, diploma, or degree program that the College of Agriculture and Bioresources offers.

b. Students on Probation

Credit Units to September of Current Year Sessional Average for Probation
18 Credit Units 50.00 - 54.99%
>18 - 48 Credit Units 55.00 - 57.49%
>48 - 120 Credit Units 57.50 - 59.99%

Students who do not meet the minimum average required for Promotion will be placed on Probation, as set out in the table above, and limited to 24 credit units (12 credit units per term) in the academic year (September to April) in which they are placed on Probation. Students whose average does not meet the minimum to be placed on Probation will be required to discontinue.

A failed course can be repeated. The highest mark in the course from the University of Saskatchewan will be used in the average calculations.

Students placed on probation can choose to repeat, once, courses that were taken during the academic session which resulted in the faculty action and for which they received a grade of 50 to 59%, and only the highest mark will be used in the average calculations. Note: once a student has passed an upper-level course, no prerequisite course can be taken for a higher mark. For example, BIOL 120 cannot be retaken if the student has already passed BIOL 222 (or its equivalent at another institution).

c. Required to Discontinue

Credit Units to September of Current Year Sessional Average for RTD
18 Credit Units < 50.00%
>18 - 48 Credit Units < 55.00%
>48 - 120 Credit Units < 57.50%

Required to Discontinue (RTD1): Student has a Sessional Weighted Average less than the minimum annual requirement to continue on Probation and has no previous faculty action at the university or any other post-secondary institution.

Penalty: Required to Discontinue from the college for the upcoming academic year (July 1 to April 30).  

A failed course can be repeated. The highest mark in the course from the University of Saskatchewan will be used in the average calculations.

Students who have been required to discontinue can choose to repeat, once, courses that were taken during the academic session which resulted in the faculty action and for which they received a grade of 50 to 59%, and only the highest mark will be used in the average calculations. Note: once a student has passed an upper-level course, no prerequisite course can be taken for a higher mark. For example, BIOL 120 cannot be retaken if the student has already passed BIOL 222 (or its equivalent at another institution).

Required to Discontinue (RTD2): Student has a Sessional Weighted Average less than the minimum annual requirement to continue on Probation and has had a previous faculty action by the university or any other post-secondary institution.

Penalty: Required to Discontinue from the college. RTD2 students require special permission of the Dean of Agriculture and Bioresources to obtain readmission to the college. Should they reapply for admission they must submit a letter explaining the reasons for their previous poor performance and indicating why they may do better if readmitted.

A failed course can be repeated. The highest mark in the course from the University of Saskatchewan will be used in the average calculations.

Students who have been required to discontinue can choose to repeat, once, courses that were taken during the academic session which resulted in the faculty action and for which they received a grade of 50 to 59%, and only the highest mark will be used in the average calculations. Note: once a student has passed an upper-level course, no prerequisite course can be taken for a higher mark. For example, BIOL 120 cannot be retaken if the student has already passed BIOL 222 (or its equivalent at another institution).

The records of students pursuing a diploma or degree who have attempted fewer than 18 credit units during the academic year (September to April) will be evaluated for promotion purposes when a cumulative total of 18 credit units of course work has been attempted since the student started taking courses, or since the student's record was last evaluated for promotion standards, whichever is the later date. Failure to meet the applicable minimum annual promotion requirement will result in the student being placed on academic Probation or Required to Discontinue. If a student who has attempted a partial load does not meet the minimum annual promotion requirement and subsequently withdraws from courses for an academic regular session (September to April), the previously unevaluated record may be omitted, at the discretion of the College, for the purposes of calculating a cumulative weighted average for the promotion evaluation.

A student is on Probation after failing to meet the minimum promotion average or after submitting a successful appeal of being Required to Discontinue by the university or any other post-secondary institution. While on Probation, the maximum course load is 24 credit units during the Regular Session. Students on Probation are not eligible for supplemental examinations. A student on Probation who does not meet the promotion standards at the end of the probationary Regular Session will be required to Discontinue. 

Promotion Regulations: A student returning to the College of Agriculture and Bioresources after an absence of one year or more will be placed under the most recent promotion regulations in effect.

Curriculum Provisions: A student returning to the College of Agriculture and Bioresources after an absence of five years or more will be placed under the curriculum requirements in effect, as of the date that the student is readmitted to the college.

Students must complete at least one-half of the overall coursework required for their degree or diploma from the University of Saskatchewan. Students transferring to a diploma program in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources must complete at least 15 credit units of approved senior course offerings while registered in the College. Students transferring to a degree in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources must complete at least 30 credit units of approved senior course offerings while registered in the College.

Only grades for classes completed at the University of Saskatchewan will be used in average calculation.

Students wishing to study abroad must have a Letter of Permission on file at the College Dean's Office prior to leaving for their exchange program and changes to the approved classes while a student is abroad must also be approved in writing or transfer credit is not guaranteed.

Except where courses have been granted exemption from a final exam, students are required to write the final examination to pass the class. This requirement must also be stipulated in the course syllabus.

Supplemental and deferred examination procedures and policies are subject to the university-wide regulations on supplemental and deferred examinations outlined in the Academic Courses Policy. For the regular supplemental and deferred examination schedule, students should refer to the Academic Calendar.

A student who is unable to write a scheduled midterm exam for valid verifiable reasons, such as medical or compassionate circumstances, must consult with their instructor as soon as is possible (and no later than three business days) to make alternate arrangements to meet the midterm examination requirements. With the approval of the Department Head, and the consent of the student, the instructor of a class is allowed some flexibility about the nature of the examination to accommodate the particular circumstances which created the need for the deferred midterm examination.

Deferred final examination: All final exams are scheduled by the University and are listed in the Academic Calendar; students must not make travel plans or schedule other activities during the examination period. Deferred exams are not granted due to conflicting travel plans.

A student who is absent from a final examination through no fault of their own and for valid verifiable reasons, such as medical or compassionate circumstances, can apply to the College of Agriculture and Bioresources for a deferred final examination. Aside from exceptional circumstances, students cannot apply for a deferred final examination if they were present for 50% or more of the time allotted for their final examination, or if they have handed in their examination for grading.

Students may experience events that are neither medical nor compassionate in nature, but may be considered reasonable grounds to apply for a deferred final examination. In this case, the student must provide a detailed account as to the basis and reasonableness of their application for a deferred final examination. Prior history, consultation with the instructor, and the circumstances of the event may be considered.

Applications for deferred examinations must be submitted to the Dean’s Office within three days of the missed examination(s) along with supporting documentary evidence (e.g., medical certificate and/or letter from the student detailing the extenuating circumstances such as an illness or death of a family member, etc.). Falsifying information on an application for examination accommodation is considered Academic Misconduct.

Deferred examinations are held during university scheduled periods, according to the Academic Calendar. A student can apply for a special deferred examination if they submit satisfactory and reasonable evidence that they are not able to be present during the regular deferred sitting, or if they are absent from a scheduled deferred exam for a valid verifiable reason such as medical or compassionate circumstances. Repeat applications for subsequent special deferred exams will only be considered under extraordinary circumstances.

Special deferred final examinations are not written during a specified examination period. Barring exceptional circumstances, special deferred final examinations are expected to be written within 30 days of the missed deferred final examination. Special deferred final examinations are scheduled at a time and date that is mutually acceptable for both instructor and student. The instructor is normally asked to invigilate the examination.

A student who is absent from a deferred or special deferred examination will have the final grade reverted to the original failing percentile submitted by the instructor for the course, unless a special deferred examination, or other arrangements, have been approved based on the above specified criteria. 

Students involved in university approved activities (e.g., Huskie Athletics or academic conferences and other scholarly activities) that require the student to travel shall be granted accommodation for attendance and assessment requirements (exams, deadlines for assignments, availability of materials, etc.) according to University regulations. Please see the Student Permission to Travel for University Business form.

Supplemental Examinations for Potential Graduates: Diploma and degree students who are otherwise eligible to graduate and who fail one class in their graduating year shall be granted a supplemental examination, provided that a final examination was held in that class. A student who fails more than one class in the graduating year may be considered for suppelemental examinations according to the following regulations: Diploma students failing to achieve a Cumulative Weighted Average of 60% on 60 credit units in the Diploma in Agribusiness or Diploma in Agronomy in the graduating year will be permitted to write a supplemental examination in a failed course provided they have achieved a Cumulative Weighted Average of 59%. Supplemental examinations may be granted to degree students in their final undergraduate year (those with potential to graduate in May or October of that year) if the minimal promotion requirements have been met in that year, the mark in the failed course is 40.0% or better, and there is a final examination in the failed course(s). Supplemental examination results replace the previously failed grade(s) for average calculations. When a supplemental examination is granted the only part of the course being rewritten is the final examination. Other determinants (labs, mid-term tests, term papers, etc.) retain their original weight in computing the final grade for the course. Students on Probation are not eligible to write supplemental exams.

Supplemental Examinations for Non-Graduates: Supplemental examinations may be granted to students who are not in their final undergraduate year, in courses taught in the College of Agriculture and Bioresources and for which there is a final examination. To be eligible for consideration, the student must meet the minimum promotion requirements, the final mark in the failed course or courses must be 40.0% or better, and it must be shown that lack of a supplemental examination will cause extreme academic difficulty. For courses taught by other colleges, the supplemental examination regulations of those colleges will prevail, except that the College of Agriculture and Bioresources eligibility requirements must also be met. Students on Probation are not eligible to write supplemental exams.

A student will not be permitted to take more than a normal course load unless a Sessional Weighted Average of 70.0% was obtained in the previous year. Program-normal course load is defined as 30 credit units for first-year students and 36 credit units for upper-year students.

A student who has completed 21 credit units for the Kanawayihetaytan Askiy Certificate, 60 credit units for a diploma, or 120 credit units for a degree but has a Cumulative Weighted Average of less than 60.0%, may take up to 18 additional credit units (18 credit weights) in order to remove this deficiency. The course(s) taken must be approved by the college in advance and for degree students only 6 credit units may be courses numbered 110 – 199. The other 12 credit units must be numbered 200.0 or greater.

A student who has credit for a course is not permitted to repeat that course to obtain a higher grade.

Students wishing to appeal decisions of the College must do so in writing to the Associate Dean Academic of Agriculture and Bioresources prior to June 30 of each year. Students can appeal based on the following: Appeals of Standing in Program (including  probationary status, RTD faculty action, and graduation, on compassionate, medical or other grounds).  Decisions on appeals of program standing will be made by the College Undergraduate Affairs Committee. Appeals of evaluation, grading, and academic standing are governed by university-wide council regulations.

Normally, the College of Agriculture and Bioresources does not approve or permit ongoing timetable conflicts involving any component of a course including lectures, laboratories, or other requirements stated in the syllabus such as tutorials and seminars.